A BLOG ABOUT EXPERIENCE BRANDS – insights

Your Jawbone is connected to your…

First off, this isn’t a rant on wearables, more a explanation on why I don’t have one*
You’d think I would, as every meeting with a tech agency requires at least someone to be smugly wearing a Jawbone (in much the way I cradled the first iPhone in 2007). They are nearly ubiquitously male, slim, media-types. Oh hang on. That’s me, isn’t it?
You wouldn’t be wrong. As someone who’s been a Creative Technologist at a number of Digital agencies, you’d think I’d have been first in the wearables-line; only swapping my Nike Fuelband at the launch of the Jawbone, before dumping that for the latest FitBit or Garmin’s Vivofit, whilst salivating over the impending Razr Nabu (the API is already open to developers). 
You know, maybe it’s sour grapes and I’m still smarting about not scrimping the cash together to fund Pebble on KickStarter… 

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#wearable technology #insights #technology #wearables

(Editorial) power to the people

When it comes to the front page of the paper, the Editor calls the shots. But are they striking the right balance between ‘important’ vs ‘popular’ vs ‘interesting’? Do they even know what their readers want? What would happen if they chose the front page stories?

News-sharing site Newswhip have put this to the test, creating People Powered front pages of major news titles, based on (you guessed it) the most shared stories at each paper:

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Faith in humanity has been maintained, as it hasn’t turned illustrious titles into a lowest common denominator den of salacious celebrity gossip, but the tone has changed on each one (some more than others). They’re a bit more human, a bit more local paper-like, and a bit broader. 

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It’s a nice experiment that suggests an interesting, disruptive way forward. Because who’s to say that there couldn’t be a more collaborative way of setting the news agenda: more dialogue, less didactic…and better than the ‘send us your pictures of the snow’-school of engagement we currently have.

Brands have been talking about ‘conversations’ with customers for a few years now. Maybe it’s time for news outlets to do the same?

#culture #news #newspapers #newswhip #Brand Experience #experiencebrands #insights

Hearts & Minds (& the rest)

Butterflies in the stomach, cold feet, a shiver down the spine - emotions are visceral things. Part of the power of Brand Experience is the physical effect on emotions, and vice versa.

Now new research has mapped the embodied feelings associated with emotions, showing how powerful and universal they are:

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Across groups of Western European and East Asian respondents (picked for their distinct cultural and linguistic environments), the similarities in responses far outweighed the differences.

So we’ll continue our mission to win over hearts and minds…but we won’t stop there.

#Brand Experience #research #emotions #embodied cognition #insights

The pros and comic-cons of auto-sharing

Ooops. The New York Comic-Con, with puppy-ish enthusiasm, has fallen foul of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, guardians of online privacy. As part of registration at NYCC 2013, social media account activation meant attendees’ Twitter accounts were used to send out breathlessly excited ghost-tweets. Predictably, many people objected and the organisers quickly backed down and apologised.

But that’s not what has piqued the EFF’s interest. Also nestling in the small print was consent to track individuals and their location via their RFID name badges, for internal use (for now, though the “possibilities are limitless”, say organisers). Now no-one is suggesting that this was for shady purposes: NYCC have said their primary goal is to unlock “a whole new level of awesomeness” for visitors. But the EFF are allergic to this kind of mission creep, and accuse them of “tainting the geek space”. Location tracking, they say, could restrict people’s enjoyment and free movement at the event. There’s a certain anonymity at a conference: people might not check out some controversial work, or cheesy childhood favourite comics, if they think this will be beamed out live. Or a young LGBT attendee, yet to come out to their parents but interested in that aspect of comic art, might not appreciate that piece of their personality being shared, perhaps with the world.

This debate has some interesting parallels with what we do. It’s a firm Jack belief that the digital and real worlds combine to create fantastic enhancements, especially to visitor experiences: in tech-aided networking, content personalisation and more. And there are some key differences between the brand experiences we create and Comic-Cons (less manga and fewer cosplayers for starters). But if people want to channel their inner Ghost Dog and slink wordlessly through our experiences…well that’s fine, especially if the alternative means holding back and not getting the most from it.

So there are some key learnings here:

1)    Visitor data is a piece of their life. Look after it.

2)    If you do want to unlock new levels of awesomeness, ask first. Manage expectations, and flag up anything unusual. If it truly is cool, attendees will love to hear about it.

3)    Let people take a non-digital path: offer incentives to participate, but don’t hobble the experience just because someone hasn’t given you the keys to their social media networks.

#rfid #pr fail #privacy #conferences #visitor experience #brandexperience #experiencebrands #insights

"Maybe 6 or 7 years ago you had the luxury of doing more brand advertising, but we don’t have that luxury anymore. If we’re going to spend money [on advertising] we have to drive traffic. We’re very retail oriented. We think like a brand, but act like a retailer."

- Mike Kappitt, CMO, Outback Steakhouse, in today’s Advertising Age.

#brand experience #retail #quote #marketing #insights

Q4 is coming…

Are you happy with the results of your marketing efforts? What’s worked? what hasn’t? What’s left to do? What is your plan to meet or exceed your targets by the end of the year?

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#insights #quote #q4 #results

brittanyselmi:

Let’s be real for a second, Facebook advertising is bad. Really bad.
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brittanyselmi:

Let’s be real for a second, Facebook advertising is bad. Really bad.

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#digital marketing #insights #ecommerce #targeting

new amex study: experiences trump material goods

#american express #consumer #insights

Today we released our annual research, Best Experience Brands. 
As you can see from the infographic, millennials truly value experience. But then again, why wouldn’t we? We’ve grown up in an age where we want more from brands than just a product or a rude sales person. 
Read about the rest of our takeaways on slideshare.

Today we released our annual research, Best Experience Brands

As you can see from the infographic, millennials truly value experience. But then again, why wouldn’t we? We’ve grown up in an age where we want more from brands than just a product or a rude sales person. 

Read about the rest of our takeaways on slideshare.

#research #insights #best experience brands #brand experience #infographic #millennials

The experience gap: a business opportunity, not just a brand opportunity
Lots of companies talk a good game about the value of a differentiating experience. Yet new research released today by Jack Morton shows that most people still rate companies’ actual experiences quite poorly.
Why is that?

Based on feedback from 4,000 consumers in the US, UK, Australia and China, much of the gap is due to the fact that most brand experiences aren’t all that unique (see chart). In almost every instance, fewer than half of people, sometimes as few as a paltry third, rate brands’ experiences as differentiated from their competitors’.
Worse, people emphasize the importance of experience drivers like the opportunity to try out products or special incentives such as free shipping or discounted service—yet they say brands aren’t actually performing well against these drivers. 
Why is it so important for brands to fix this? With over half of people worldwide saying they’ll pay more for a great experience, differentiating on the basis of experience and delivering beyond expectations aren’t just marketing opportunities—they’re business opportunities.
Read the Best Experience Brands 2013 study on our Slideshare channel.

The experience gap: a business opportunity, not just a brand opportunity

Lots of companies talk a good game about the value of a differentiating experience. Yet new research released today by Jack Morton shows that most people still rate companies’ actual experiences quite poorly.

Why is that?

#trends #insights #best experience brands #research