A BLOG ABOUT EXPERIENCE BRANDS

Here's Why Brands Are Speaking Spanish in General Market Ads

Dish, ESPN, Hyundai and others are mainstreaming their Hispanic marketing campaigns instead of purely using Spanish language advertising on Spanish language TV networks, radio stations, etc.  Why, you might ask?  In part because of the World Cup, but that’s not the whole story.

Today, there is high crossover appeal for general market TV ads run in English and Spanish.  Hispanic consumers aren’t just watching Spanish language television, and appreciate seeing bilingual ads on mainstream channels.   Also, millennial consumers are multicultural and respond better to advertising when it reflects the world around them.  

This shift toward mainstreaming Hispanic marketing also coincides with large population and spending growth among Hispanic Americans.  Hispanics now make up 17% of the US population and spend around 1.3 trillion dollars every year.  This new bilingual marketing effort allows advertisers to speak to them through multiple vehicles.  For example, Dish Network blended English and Hispanic marketing by producing an ad that combined both languages into a single execution.

#multicultural #crossover #millennials #spanish

Tiny Rebellion Is Doing Well by Doing Good

Tiny Rebellion, a Santa Monica-based agency, is setting out to prove that affecting positive change can be profitable.  This agency only works with companies that do good, and they seek to help visionaries bring their brands to the public.  Their client roster includes TrueCar, a brand trying to bring transparency to automotive retail, and BoltHouse Farms, a juice company dedicated to healthy living.  

It’s great to see an agency trying to be a force for positive change, and while doing good and making a profit may seem to be incongruous goals, Tiny Rebellion proves otherwise.  They identify the right for-profit companies to work with, and amplify their impact to further their clients’ world-changing missions.  

Lollapalooza Goes Cashless With Digital Wristbands

FINALLY, us concertgoers won’t have to worry about losing our previous credit cards when we go to festivals. All we have to do is tap and pay!

Lollapalooza is rolling out a new initiative this week called Lolla Cashless that use radio frequency identification (or RFID)-enabled wristbands for payments. Let’s hope that this will make the lines for food and drinks a lot shorter… 

The tech-enabled wristbands also work offline, a smart move considering Internet connections at these types of events tend to be less than stellar. The point-of-sale systems will store transactions until they can be processed later if the Internet goes down.

Lollapalooza’s effort that layers in e-commerce is interesting because it shows how music festivals testing new types of payments may give some additional insight into how millennials actually use their smartphones at events.

Next step would be to use the wristband as both a method for payment as well as identification and I would be able to leave my wallet at home! 

#trends #concert #cashless

This just in… ok, not really. I’d absolutely love to say my experience at the Forrester Customer Experience Forum (East) was remarkable and unmistakeable (along with being trusted and essential - the 4 parts of Forrester’s TRUE brand framework). But, alas, I can’t. I really don’t mean it to be snarky - we’ve been talking about this a lot and are all guilty somewhere along the line - saying not showing. So I guess it was a little disappointing to not see even one innovative experiential activity or touch. Missed opportunity, I think. Or maybe it’s more of a b2b bias - where we focus so heavily on the consumer experience (consumer as end user) that we forget about all those other brand experiences with other businesses. It was nice to see a focus on culture and employees - Steve Cannon of Mercedes Benz did a great job emphasizing its importance and backing it up with the program dollars to prove it. But despite several questions from the audience on the role of brand experience in b2b and the requests of previous attendees to include more of it, the lone b2b session was the very last presentation on the very last day and felt like more of a token than a recognition of its importance. Too bad. Two opportunities missed.

This just in… ok, not really. I’d absolutely love to say my experience at the Forrester Customer Experience Forum (East) was remarkable and unmistakeable (along with being trusted and essential - the 4 parts of Forrester’s TRUE brand framework). But, alas, I can’t. I really don’t mean it to be snarky - we’ve been talking about this a lot and are all guilty somewhere along the line - saying not showing. So I guess it was a little disappointing to not see even one innovative experiential activity or touch. Missed opportunity, I think. Or maybe it’s more of a b2b bias - where we focus so heavily on the consumer experience (consumer as end user) that we forget about all those other brand experiences with other businesses. It was nice to see a focus on culture and employees - Steve Cannon of Mercedes Benz did a great job emphasizing its importance and backing it up with the program dollars to prove it. But despite several questions from the audience on the role of brand experience in b2b and the requests of previous attendees to include more of it, the lone b2b session was the very last presentation on the very last day and felt like more of a token than a recognition of its importance. Too bad. Two opportunities missed.

Ad of the Day: In Sequel to Viral Smash, Pantene Urges Women to Stop Apologizing

Last week, a new Pantene ad became a conversation starter with a convicting call to action: women of the world, stop apologizing.  The commercial was a follow-up of sorts to an ad Pantene Philippines ran last year about labels society gives successful men versus successful women.  The message was simple…and infuriating.  

They get their point across clearly once again in this new ad.  It shows women in a variety of situations, apologizing where an apology is not needed- for example, before sharing an opposing idea in a meeting, or after being jostled by the person sitting next to her.  Then, the ad replays the same encounters, only this time the women don’t apologize.  

Through this ad, Pantene shines light on an unfortunate habit while encouraging women to shine strong.  They’re proving to be an authentic brand and staying true to their promise of celebrating strong women and educating them to overcome societal expectations.  It turns out Pantene is more than shampoo- its a gender bias revolution.  


#powerful #convicting

It was reported this week that BA are facing the threat of new strike action this summer. Having watched A Very British Airline, the BBC’s recent behind-the-scenes look at the company, I can’t say I’m surprised.

In a segment on the airline’s steward training programme, the voiceover cheerfully revealed that as labour supply far outstrips demand new starters are paid next to nothing. We then saw young hopefuls booted off the course for such trivial misdemeanours as being two minutes late or not wearing enough lipstick.

Officious trainers patronised and reprimanded wannabe cabin crew in scenes interwoven with clips of first class cabins being inspected for even the tiniest scratch. It goes without saying that in the airline industry a rigorous employee vetting process is essential, but everyone ought to be treated with respect whether they’re drinking the champagne or serving it.

As discussed in more detail in our Your people, your brand’ white paper, successful experience brands don’t just focus on the customer, they create a consistent, compelling experience for every stakeholder – not least employees on the front line.

#ba #airline industry #brand experience #strikes #a very british airline #experience brands #british airways

Customer Experience Secrets Revealed! Barely 30 minutes into the Forrester Customer Experience event in NYC this morning and already the big reveal. Forrester’s work on Customer Experience has always focused on 3 core dimensions - Effectiveness, Ease, and Emotion. Each of these dimensions contributes significantly to the quality of your brand’s overall customer experience. But what are the drivers of those dimensions? Forrester principal analyst Megan Burns gave us a sneak peek into the most recent research into the factors that drive the most important of those dimensions in 11 of the 17 industries Forrester evaluated - Emotion. If you want to drive customer loyalty - grab them emotionally.
But how exactly do you do that? The new study reveals there are 3 drivers: 
Make them feel valued
Resolve customer problems or issues quickly
Talk to customers in plain language
Where the first 2 are kind of d’ohs - the last one is a bit of an aha. We know all you brands love your jargon (almost as much as we agencies do) - but save it for the office. Your customers want to feel valued, listened to, and treated like intelligent people - and nothing kills those feelings like an avalanche of blah blah blah.

Customer Experience Secrets Revealed! Barely 30 minutes into the Forrester Customer Experience event in NYC this morning and already the big reveal. Forrester’s work on Customer Experience has always focused on 3 core dimensions - Effectiveness, Ease, and Emotion. Each of these dimensions contributes significantly to the quality of your brand’s overall customer experience. But what are the drivers of those dimensions? Forrester principal analyst Megan Burns gave us a sneak peek into the most recent research into the factors that drive the most important of those dimensions in 11 of the 17 industries Forrester evaluated - Emotion. If you want to drive customer loyalty - grab them emotionally.

But how exactly do you do that? The new study reveals there are 3 drivers: 

  1. Make them feel valued
  2. Resolve customer problems or issues quickly
  3. Talk to customers in plain language

Where the first 2 are kind of d’ohs - the last one is a bit of an aha. We know all you brands love your jargon (almost as much as we agencies do) - but save it for the office. Your customers want to feel valued, listened to, and treated like intelligent people - and nothing kills those feelings like an avalanche of blah blah blah.

How can we foster creative thinking in our industry? It starts in the schoolroom.

There’s never been a more exciting time for creativity than right now, said Marc Pritchard, Global Brand Building officer for P&G.  Media fragmentation may have killed the golden age of advertising but it has given birth to a golden age of ideas — where we can work with an ever-evolving and expanding creative canvas of marketing opportunity.
 
But how do we get those ideas?  According to BBDO Guerrero you have to create a lot of crap ideas to get to a good one and they have created an online tool, the Crap Ideas Generator, to help you get there.  While it may not be necessary to have a specific tool to manage idea-creation, the principle of idea volume is a sound one.  Sturgeon’s law that 90% of all art forms are crap is commonly cited, but he wasn’t alone — as David Guerrero mentioned in his talk, former British Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli concurred that 9/10 books are nonsense.  So it stands to reason that if most ideas aren’t great, then we need to create lots of them in order to get a good one and even more to get a great one.
 
There’s a very healthy debate in the industry about how we go about creating these great ideas — as evidenced throughout the week at Cannes.  Training yourself to find opportunity by thinking in the left-field is a common theme. Jason Silva spoke of ‘the adjacent possible’ where we can seize opportunities by asking ‘what if?’ and Sense Worldwide challenged us to ‘embrace the ugly’ because breakthrough ideas often don’t look aesthetically pleasing.  As Guerrero said, we need to find ways to get our brains to jump out of their pre-set patterns.
 
If this is a concern for us in the industry, where at least we are having healthy discussions on the topic, how much of a concern should it be for our children?  Tham Khai Meng of Ogilvy & Mather said this week, “We are all born creative. We just got it educated out of us.” This, the next generation of creative marketers, are more often than not in an education system structured to create workers for a 19th century industrial economy, not the ideas economy of now and the future. And it’s not just about effective marketing. Astrophysicist Neil Degrasse Tyson warned us that our culture will fade unless we value problem-solving creativity.
 
This is exactly the issue Sommer + Sommer addressed in their workshop ‘How to Foster Creativity in 21st Century Education?’  Along with the Berlin School of Creative Leadership, the German creative agency asked Cannes greatest minds (and more than 100 other creatives and futurists in 35 countries) to inspire an innovative framework for 21st century schooling which will be published as the Classroom Thinktank.  I can’t wait to read it.  Creative thinking starts in the schoolroom, and if we want our industry to thrive we need to actively participate in the future of education.
 

#canneslions #creativity #education #ideas

Channel Your Inner Courtney

It was heartening to hear at the IPG breakfast – ‘Breakfast with Women Who Bring Home the Bacon’ of the increasing number of woman members on the Cannes juries.  And of how mostly they didn’t experience a gender division on the juries in terms of attitudes towards creativity, aside from a very few entries that prompted a showing of latent machismo amongst some members. 

Meanwhile Vasudha Narayanan, Creative Director at Lowe Lintas was interviewed regarding the ground-breaking campaign for Tanishq highlighting the stigma of second marriage for women in India.  It served as a reminder that women around the world still face very real restrictions to the kind of life choices many of us take for granted and give us the freedom to focus our energies elsewhere, such as our careers. 

Yet there is much to be achieved here, as Sheryl Sandberg pointed out in her seminar – only 3% of creative directors are women.  And she credits this huge imbalance to a cultural problem – as a society we don’t expect women to be leaders.  This was echoed by Leslie Sims, ECD McCann NY, who argued at the breakfast that since many women are not naturally great self-promoters, but rather great team builders, we need to do a better job of actively recognising and promoting those that are excellent in their jobs because they are far less likely to step forward than their male counterparts. 

This may be so, but think also of Courtney Love who during her Cannes seminar put her success down to her sheer fearless ambition – perhaps as agency women we all need to channel our inner Courtneys a little also. 

This is a love love. Paint the faces of soccer stars on a giant canvas using only a soccer ball. Simple. Brilliant. World class World Cup experiential idea.