A BLOG ABOUT EXPERIENCE BRANDS

Social Media Week Sydney – Living in the Culture of Participation 

Katie Chatfield from our Sydney team, hosting a panel session to explore the different ways of celebrating cultural experiences by blending new forms of participatory media with the old.  She designed the session as well as inviting the speakers, which includes representative from Southern Cross Austereo, Australian Chamber Orchestra, the NSW Waratahs, the Emmy award winning television producers Hoodlum and the University of Sydney.

Peak insight

flying haiku

Have been lucky enough to be at the Spikes Festival of Creativity in Singapore. I’ve been involved in the forum sessions about creative talent and I presented on this:

Does your business value creative thinking? Of course it does, and you are almost certainly one of the 91% that believes it impacts directly on your company’s success. But are you one of only 26% of employees who strongly believe their working culture encourages creative thought? And where does this leave the future success of our businesses?

While we all know it’s important, one of the fundamental challenges organisations have is in developing a culture of innovation and inspiration. Jack Morton conducted research among employees across the globe which suggests the lack of understanding and consequent support for creative thinking could be hampering effective creative output and the ability of business to attract and retain talent.

This Forum discusses to what degree business across the globe is actively encouraging a culture and environment conducive to creative thinking and consider the success stories of those organisations that hold the nurturing and promotion of creative thinking close to their hearts.

I think that the case for change for our industry and for Enterprise is quite well-known. We know why we need to change (disruption) and we know we need to change (creativity and innovation be that digital, integration or whatever) the challenge is away going to be how.

In Andrew Ho’s session he spoke about a better marriage of strategy and creative and how the tools, perspective and approaches of each discipline works better in combination rather than pass (or parse) the parcel, and a  question ‘will we ever run out of insight?’ really stimulated some reflection on the experience of presenting and facilitating my own session.

The questions around how we deliver great ideas, how we can innovate our process, how we can support people through this journey are  tough to answer.

And here’s the journey to my refection. Jack’s creativity research puts forward 6 recommendations to help build more creative cultures: collaboration, play, freedom to fail, space to think, ego support and idea collection. The best kind of cultures have all of these aspects and I wanted to create an experience of what those six principles in action might look like. I love the haikugami tool

  • as of freedom to fail I show a haiku written about my own work culture and attempt to demonstrate how to fold a paper plane- giving permission to people to make their version as imperfect and human as they like
  • I tell them a story of collaboration, how I’ve sought out their participation by putting a sheet under each of their seats. I tell them about the goal- let’s make a hundred co-created wishes for creative culture fly. I want their thoughts and expression, but I want us to share and build on our thoughts
  • I ask for playfulness a thought articulated in only 5 or 7 syllables, and line by line I ask them to stand up and let their thoughts fly across the room, and to jump and catch someone else s thought as it flies past
  • ego support is about making the rewards of creativity real, fun  and transparent, hopefully a room full of heads down and the energy of sharing reflects this notion
  • the conference and the session itself is place to think, a context that is designed to open up different parts of the brain
  • and I collect ideas and celebrate participation at the end. The photo above is just some of what I was given back from the audience

What did I learn? What thing did I see, what human truth did I observe, from delivering this experience to  room full of punters wanting creativity, believing in  creativity and eve working in creative fields?

It’s really award and uncomfortable to move from a passive state to one of participation.

It’s hard to know what’s the right thing to say when you’re asked to express your feelings.

And that’s the point- creativity feels chaotic  and a bit weird if you’re not used to it. It’s the reason why there’s such a gap between the desire for these kinds of cultures and them grit it takes to deliver them. But the  results! I have a hundred poems: inspiring, playful and brave that tell the story of what can happen in a room when you start to do things differently.

Peak insight? I think I’ve only just started to learn about the power and potential of human creativity.

What is your brand doing to stop your customers from leaving before they actually do?
"66% of consumers switched brands or business due to poor customer service last year. Some 82% of those who switched said the brand could have done something to stop them."(Accenture, November 2013)

What is your brand doing to stop your customers from leaving before they actually do?

"66% of consumers switched brands or business due to poor customer service last year. Some 82% of those who switched said the brand could have done something to stop them."
(Accenture, November 2013)

NFL announcers keep calling Surface tablet 'iPad'

This is why you need to consider the entire ecosystem when activating a sponsorship. How are you training both activators and influencers as part of your sponsorship activation program?

#sponsorship #branding #fail

As marketers, we’re in the persuasion business, yet psychology and science rarely enter the conversation.

Doesn’t this seem strange?

If we want to become more effective at changing consumer behaviour, why don’t we delve deeper into behavioural economics? Or gain a clearer understanding of what attention is, and how it works, so that we can help brands “cut-through” the clutter?

We live in a time of great advances in many different fields. This is creating a new reality for brands, and a deeper understanding of the unconscious forces that shape how we think, feel and behave. It simply makes sense to combine these forces with people’s inherent desire for stimulation and engagement to create better experiences for brands.

At Jack, we’re not cognitive scientists; we’re in the business of creative communications. But we do use science to better connect people to brands. We’ve been codifying and distilling the research available, so that we can build better experiences by applying these insights in a systematic way.

We call this approach experiential coding. Read the full white paper here.

#Experience Design #jackmorton

Prankvertising: it’s basically Candid Camera with a packshot at the end, isn’t it? But - done right - it’s endlessly entertaining. And it’s not (just) schadenfreude. It’s because we never get tired of seeing genuine reactions and emotions. Real people, in real places, experiencing real things.

With that in mind, here’s ‘Fins-bury Shark’ - a brilliantly simple activation to promote Discovery Channel’s #SharkWeekUK.

#prankvertising #discovery channel #Brand Experience #experiencebrands #experiential

Jack Morton for SXSW 2015

image

March of 2015 marks the date for the next South By South West festival for Music, Film and Interactive and Jack would like to be there!   

This year we’re excited to have three different panel submissions for the event, but 30% of the selection process is through public votes, so we need your help.

Read more

#SXSW2015 #brands

OK, I’m all for branding but this just feels wrong in so many ways. Imagine the possibilities - ad supported fire hydrants (Iams), fire hoses (Smart Water), axes (Lowe’s)… Then again, maybe I’m thinking about it the wrong way. For the right brand (Fenway Franks, say) it could be marv-e-lous.
Here’s a selling point from their pitch: “Code 3 lights and sirens command impressions like nothing else!”
Um, yeah…

OK, I’m all for branding but this just feels wrong in so many ways. Imagine the possibilities - ad supported fire hydrants (Iams), fire hoses (Smart Water), axes (Lowe’s)… Then again, maybe I’m thinking about it the wrong way. For the right brand (Fenway Franks, say) it could be marv-e-lous.

Here’s a selling point from their pitch: “Code 3 lights and sirens command impressions like nothing else!”

Um, yeah…

The right message, to the right person, at the right time: it’s the ultimate goal of marketing and comms. And Cancerfonden (the Swedish Cancer Society) have hit the nail firmly on the head with this clever activation. 

Melanoma cases have doubled since 2000, which they think is due to Swedes remembering to cover up on holiday but forgetting to do so at home. So they created a shaded area for people.

But there’s more: it’s also a soccer pitch…and the field of play is marked out by lines of sunlight that are only visible between 11am and 3pm. To put it another way: the moment the message is relevant, the activation comes to life. And by creating a place to play, they’ve given people a compelling reason to step out of the sun - an experiential pull, not an above-the-line push. ‘The medium is the message’, as Malcolm McLuhan would say.

#cancerfonden #Brand Experience #experiencebrands #inspiration

The value of cu$tomer experience. Helping to build the case that creating an experience your customers value feeds the bottom line, a recent study by Medallia reports some impressive numbers. They ran their model against both subscription- and transaction-based businesses to show that higher customer experience scores correlated highly with greater spend and loyalty. And while the results focus on top line growth, they also found significant evidence supporting the idea that delivering better customer experiences actually result in LOWER costs due to savings on customer service, returns, churn, and other things associated with less-than-stellar experiences.